Daily Learning curve of having Great shaves!

Discussion in 'Shave School' started by Ron R, Mar 10, 2018.

  1. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Looking for a razor that might interest you for a possible daily driver, looks like Martin took another survey and gathered a lot of info and spent hrs doing this for our pleasure on daily razor drivers, I also contributed my daily drivers to this survey. People still like their vintage razors it seems to me and the information shows it! ENJOY.
    Sorry about the visual but it was the best I could do to get all the information on one picture.

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    Last edited: Apr 30, 2018
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  2. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    We all have to start out some where(good starter kit IMO) and this is just a short list of products I wish I new when I ventured into the double edge shaving enjoyment.
    I'm using a lot of Italian barber(RazoRock )products as just a reference because I'm familiar with them. Here is a short list.
    Clubman Aftershave $9.00 US
    Razorock SLOC with barber pole handle $20.00-this is such a forgiving setup. Looks aggressive but gentle as lamb, kitten.......!(very hard to get nicks or weepers from this head + DFS>BBS)
    Razorock mission razor head only $7.00- for later after you get your technique just right gives a DFS>BBS with good technique.(some say its similar to EJ de89 or a Merkur 34c ???)
    Razorock Plissoft brush $10.00
    Italian barber Amici soap$3.00- good starter soap and economical-its under Italian barber soaps if looking not under Razorock soaps-why:confused:?
    Tuck of 10 blades $1.50 Personna red platinum blades- excellent blade.(Astra SP blade alternative or Rapira platinum lux.)
    Witch hazel $5.00 - good for skin toner --Walmart
    Total $54.50 add another $11.00 + of Italian barber products gets you($60.00+) free shipping for a good start to see if its your new way to shave.(lots of other great starter razors and soaps.....)
    Other shaving suppliers have good starter kits also, but I'm not familiar with their products and pricing so giving advice is limited. Some offer free shipping after so much $ spent also.

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    Last edited: May 2, 2018
    Paul Turner likes this.
  3. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    If you are having a very bad post shave after completing the shaving task and rinsed off soap and there is redness and burning you should STOP and re-evaluate the soap products or new razor blade.....pre-shave.... It might be a good idea to take a sample and apply it on a small area of the arm to see if it affects it to pin point any issues or what product that is the causing redness or burning sensation . I have had no issues with lots of different products but I know some folks will mention it at times on different forum treads with allergic reactions . Reactions could happen with any type of shaving product or method (Cartridge, Straight edge or Double edge products ) its one of those issues to be aware of with so many different new products reaching through retail and internet + offshore. (Good idea to read ingredients label)
    Aftershaves will give a burn sensation from a bit of Alcohol that is usually added to mixture or cooling sensation from Menthol so they are expected and are short lived for 30-40 seconds at most and then calm down and disappear quickly. (I'm not trying to confuse the two different issues Alcohol & menthol VS allergies .)

    Have some great shaves!
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2018
  4. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Try not to rush a shave, that is when you get into nicks and weepers.....
    It's your time for that 10-30 minute of personal interest of your looks or appearance and there will be times when you will maybe have to rush(wife going into labour..... or someone has to really use the bathroom.....:rofl:)
    People who have some shaving experience will always mention not to rush a shave especially with a straight edge. If time is of a factor just go for a one pass people will not notice until around 5-6 hrs later or try a cartridge you might have lying around.(it will bother you more than any one else)
     
  5. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Some times watching someone shave can be comical because they make some strange facials . The reason for some of those expressions of their face is to stretch the skin to help in making a better surface for the razor to snip the follicles of beard growth. Some shavers will blow their cheeks with air (Bull frogging)to firm the skin, some will stick their tongue behind their bottom lip area to prop the skin outward for the blade to snip hairs. Straight razor folks tend to wrap their arm around the back of the neck and pull the side burns upward for the edge of the blade to do its job better. Young shavers do not have to stretch the skin much at all because their skin is nice and firm still, as you age it seems your skin seems to sag a little or form those wrinkles no one really wants IMO. So we stretch a little skin to firm the skin for the blade to do its job better it seems.
    The results can be a little better shave when stretching your skin it seems but over pulling the skin to much can work against you if you are prone to ingrown hairs(the pulled skin whiskers when relaxed back to normal can be below the skin and angular snipped sharp). Just don't over do the stretching of skin and gently tug, blow, tongue prop. If you like to use your fingers stretching the skin a little rubbing of alum will also help in the chore to prevent the fingers slipping on facial lather. Alum is also great for holding the razor handle if you find it slippery or hard to handle.
    Have some great shaves! :whacky024: :whacky011:
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
  6. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    To bloom or not to bloom a hard soap might be interest for some. I have tried both methods and with some of my hard triple milled soaps (Tabac). The thought behind the practice is to soften the soap with some warm water by filling it just above the soap puck to gather a richer quicker lather(your brush will collect the softened soap easier). I seem to get very similar results with just a moistened brush in about the same time period.
    I think the practice was used for brushes that were to soft or worn out IMO. Today's soaps seem to create great lather with just a moistened brush with out wasting a expensive soap. If you get a stubborn soap that will not lather which is rare you might want to try blooming that hard soap. If you decide to bloom a puck of hard soap don't throw the bloomed water down the sink right away but instead use it for a pre-shave lotion. YMMV for this practice, but most of the time it is not necessary IMO.
    Have some great shaves;).
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    Last edited: May 9, 2018
  7. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Cold water shaving is one of those subjects that most will read or hear about. I do a combination of warm and cold , I start off prepping warm and I really like rinsing with cold water because we are running a very sharp object across your skin so irritation can become noticeable or feeling it. My face just loves the cold rinses after each pass and have hardly any irritation for the simple application. I can go on about the pros and cons but this fellow will explain it if you are interested at all and It will not cost you nothing to try this task.

     
  8. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Blade care & handling is very important to your shaving enjoyment regardless what method to be used(DE, SE, Cartridge & electric). Try not to bump, wipe or keep wet when storing and blade life will last longer. If you have razors that work with certain blades or experimenting with blade to razor combinations, I find fridge magnets work very well for me. The DE blades stay flat and fridge magnet material is a rubbery flexible texture that does not have a large magnet powerful force when trying to remove them when needed. Try not to get into habit of storing them back into original paper wrappings unless your a perfectionist because chances of edge damage is possible. Flipping the blade like some do is easier when stored on a fridge magnet it seems, flipping some believe extends the life, but it is so minuet and you would need a microscope to check- there are some folks who go to extremes to play. Flipping blade prevents curling of edge.(jury still out on that issue) The Excalibur club try to push a blade to extremes for the # of shaves they get, not sure how the blade feels after 8> times of use YMMV:signs131: they will flip and strop blades to no end.
    [​IMG]
    HAND stropping did not seem to help me and needs to be done gently and could be a littleeee dangerous, not worth the effort IMO. Let your face be the strop and just enjoy the blade for its normal shave life. Some folks just leave the blade in the razor so less handling is needed and seem to get good blade life they claim.
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    Last edited: Jun 1, 2018
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  9. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Characteristic's of good lather that are important for shaving whether DE, SE, or cartridge that will only give you a better shave.
    Cushion: my interpretation of this is the ability of the lather foam to suspend or keep the hairs off the face for the razor & blade to snip whiskers.

    Slickness: my interpretation is a film of lather lubricant that is left on the skin to help glide the razor & blade across surface while slicing whiskers.

    Appearance: Lather has to have reasonable good appearance so you can determine if it is to dry or overly moist and also act as a guide for consecutive passes that will progress during the shave.
    Post shave : its nice when a soap leaves the skin soft & supple = bonus(Haslinger Schafmilch come to mind)
    Scent : its nice to have a scent that you like in the morning because you deserve it = bonus (not necessary to perform the shave)

    I personally like a moist thicker cushion lather that can be attained in about minute by brush with a lathering bowl for the 1st pass of the shave to suspend the whiskers and deposit lots of slickness for following passes.(stick soap you use discretion for water needed for the passes.)
    The 2nd and 3rd pass & cleanups a more thin watery slurry type of lather for slickness is more desired because the bulk of whiskers have been thinned out by 1st pass and cushion loft is not required as much as slickness becomes the more important characteristic that prevents weepers and nicks IMO.

    Like this good example below for 2nd, 3rd pass and clean ups.

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    Cushion without slickness is terrible , when you shave. Slickness without cushion, still a possible great shave.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2018
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  10. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Some times shaving can be routine and a little change is needed to have a little entertainment . It could be a new razor or a blast from the past. Today my razor was a Schick "e" injector I recently picked up from a antique store for under $15 with 20 blades. Scrubbed & sterilized the razor & new blade and I had a interesting morning with many more to come. It likes short strokes and is a mild shaver IMO. It produced a DFS for a razor that is older than most people(80yrs+).This razor was very popular for its day and gave Gillette a run for popularity and cost. Schick blades are thicker & more rigid than a DE blade and injector blades are still made for all these compatible Schick injector razors. Schick blades were more expensive but lasted longer and when they introduced the injector twin blade that was basically the start of plastic disposable razor revolution because the other Blade manufactures had nothing like a twin blade they had to scramble to bring something to compete with Schick is my understanding of that era. Schick twin blades are still MFG in Japan today for the injectors, people over in the orient also enjoy injectors like North Americans do.
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    Last edited: May 18, 2018
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  11. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Sometimes you get a razor that has great potential but it is just to mild. Getting the right blade for that razor might be the answer and more enjoyable close shaves could easily be obtained. I was skeptical at first about different blades for different razors, but there is some merit to the right combination. A mild razor with a sharp blade is more forgiving and can produce great results. A aggressive razor with positive blade exposure would give great results with a mid range blade. So finding a blade that gives you the desired results are beneficial. The ideal sweet spot is at the top of this simple graph that is desirable with good technique. KIA blades are slightly wider than a standard blade and that can also improve a mild razor, so it's up to the operator to match razor to blade. Mild to mid range razor with a sharp blade is ideal for me because of my beard coarseness.
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    This is just a example that could give great results.(worked for me) The Feather would be my choice if desired results is what we wanted but it will cost more for the shave!
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2018
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  12. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

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    3 passes and clean up all done with one lathering to reduce time!(8-12 minute shave):shaver

    I know that every one has time constraints & luckily some do not most of their time(retired). If you are the type that is very active or late riser and want a good quick shave and like just the DE method there is a way. The best way is just use some Gillette shaving gel Goo and fill a plastic bowl (or let the tap trickle)with water wet the face with water & hand lather like you normally would. With one hand you will shave and the other will be the dipping water hand. The objective is to only shave a small area(2X2> inches), you would do WTG first while wetting the hand after 1st pass to pull a little lather and re-activate the slickness for 2nd pass XTG in this 2X2> inch area. Third pass will be if you do ATG will be done by dipping the free hand in the water and reactivating the dried slickness and pulling a little lather in from the unshaven area if needed and Braille feeling the skin if a clean-up is needed and onto the next small unshaven area. You Don't need shaving gel or foam and could use a brush and soap but you have clean up that follows losing time. This method will cut your time easily in half or greater. I HAVE DONE this over 14 times to test for those rushed days that pop up from time to time.
    I like the re-lathering method after each pass, but we all have different time constraints and I'm retired and have lots of time to share a little knowledge on saving time.(Lots of times I mentioned time ....... I won't waste any more of your time of this subject any more:rofl:.)
    Have some great shaves
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2018
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  13. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Different strokes for Different folks, I have noticed that some like short shaving strokes and some like Andy on the "northern shaver "on you tube like these long sweeping strokes and they seem to get hardly any nicks or weepers. The first pass is usally short strokes for most because of whiskers clogging the blade edge and rinsing draws a little water up with the razor to activate the lather slickness on the skin to help in shaving. 2nd and 3rd passes and clean ups is were it gets different for some because the razor glides much easier and confidence level increases and longer strokes seem to occur more IMO. When starting to DE shave forget about these long and sweeping strokes because you are bound to get into nicks and weepers that will discourage you from proceeding ahead with the DE method possibly. Chin , jaw and nose areas are short stroke areas for most shavers and control of any razor is a must to prevent the negative results of cuts and weepers .The guys who take these long strokes have been shaving for some time and know the razor and blade they are using and make it look soooo easy. As you gain experience you will naturally know yourrr limits and stay within those boundary's to enjoy shaving IMO. I like shorter strokes to rinse more when using a double open comb razor to draw residual water up to help with reactivating lubrication of the lather and skin.
    Have some great shaves!
     
  14. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Different strokes for Different folks, Part 2, the tortoise and Hare scenario were who gets to finish line first wins. I do not think shaving is quite like that but we sooner than later get to the finish of the shave and how that is accomplished is up to the operator of the razor. Speed (Velocity)of the razor glancing along the skin snipping the whiskers is really the experience of the person who controls the razor. I have watched folks who have very slow strokes and faster strokes and both get reasonable results. The first pass of the shave were the stubble is thicker the pass is usually a slower pass and that is gauged by the operator to knock it down with reasonable comfort. Passes 2&3 and clean up the pace of stroke might increase a little. There are so many variables that can make it a faster stroke like a mild razor with a sharp smooth blade with a excellent slick soap the stroke speed can increase as compared to a aggressive razor with positive blade exposure with even a slick soap stroke speed should be slower. A simple formula (Cutting whiskers = edge sharpness+weight or pressure of razor+ razor velocity)

    Example :when splitting fire wood if the axe is just gravity dropped there is not much that is going to happen but when a healthy swing is incorporated the results are more favorable.

    When most start to shave a slower to moderate speed is the best way to get reasonable results and you will throttle the razor to your desired speed for the shave. If for some reason you have to go fast a mild razor & sharp smooth blade(Rapira lux blade comes to mind) is first choice to get reasonable results.(Razor speed for :whacky024:'s is nottt as important as good hand razor technique if that helps you along having great shaves.) Seasoned shavers just know their boundary of speeds and razor capabilities to make it look easy and that is what the desired skills most will reach with in a reasonable time frame depending on individual attitude.
    There is not lot of shaving information on proper razor speed(velocity) because maybe there is so many variables that has to be considered.
    Have some great shaves!
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
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  15. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Shaving in the shower seems to be done by some and they very much enjoy it with good results. Concept is you have very little clean up with a moist lather and hydrated whiskers.
    I tried this once (experimenting) and was not that impressed because my shower is small and finding a spot to put my shaving gear was not there and I was out of my comfort zone and went back to shaving after a shower. If you have a large showering area I could see it maybe working and don't mind wasting a lot of expensive hot water. A fog free mirror would be nice and a razor holder and you would use gel or foam more than likely. So a little investment could be worth it I guess.
    To me having a bath tub filled with warm water and having a little stand (toliet seat down >makeshift) with my shaving gear easy to reach would be more my desirable thought with a little drink of rum on the side in the middle of winter having a nice soaking and having a shave.(that I will do someday now that I'm thinking of it.) I always remember the western Maverik brothers movie(James Gardner-Dad and Mel Gibson -Maverick) when they are in the tub smoking a cigar having a drink and having a relaxing time B.S. until they get robbed.
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    Yup, I think this would be a good way to shave and I would willing to pay for this scenario to happen , Lucky Cowboy after a hard day.
     
  16. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Shaving distractions sometimes are unavoidable and when they happen is how you deal with them will determine how the out come of the shave ends. Some people can hog the bathroom at crucial time zone and others are wanting to use the bathroom.(1 bathroom was more common at one time in a 1,000 sq ft bungalow in the 60's 70's.) I think distractions with a straight edge than a DE is a more serious matter because there is no safety bar. Radios blaring or doors accidentally bumping the person and the dog scratching the door or .........
    I find early in the morning before anyone is a wake is a good time for me to shave with hardly any distractions. It's amazing watching youtube shaving celebrity's when they get distracted it takes them a 10 > seconds to refocus where they left off with the shaving conversation was going and weepers or nicks start to appear it seems.
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    Maybe its a good time to hand the girl friend a Cartridge razor when she offers to shave.:happy097::rofl:
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2018
  17. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Skin irritations are something that can be avoided whether (SE,DE,Straight razor or cartridge razor.) 20180530_084403_crop_667x592.jpg
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    Why not have young healthy looking skin!:eatdrink047:
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
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  18. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Explaining the parameters of a DE razor and there are limited excellent illustrations to help people who have heard terminology that describes this tool.
    So instead of making some crude explanation diagrams and you searching the internet endlessly I shorten the step for some.
    When some one describes blade gap when I first started DE shaving:signs131: or positive blade exposure:confused: I did not know exactly what they were talking about.
    This fellow(Grant) did a excellent job describing and spent some time effort to help us all understand it. Safety_Razor_Parameters_around_Blade_Cutting_Edge (2).jpg
     
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  19. jmudrick

    jmudrick Well-Known Member

    This should be required reading. I can't believe the number of self styled experts who talk about exposure while they point to cap span.

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
     
  20. Ron R

    Ron R Well-Known Member

    Tomorrow I will show you how I test blade exposure and any one can do it if they have a few basic tools. I have to admit Grant did a excellent job of description and can go overboard on certain topics- this one he hit a home run IMO.
     
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