RubberSet 55-3 Came Today

Discussion in 'The Brush' started by S Barnhardt, Sep 7, 2019.

  1. S Barnhardt

    S Barnhardt Old, Crusty Barn

    I had this RubberSet 55-3, that I'd bought, come in the mail today. From my limited experience with this kind of thing, I'm going to venture that it doesn't look to be in "bad" shape. Not mint by any stretch of the imagination, but not terrible. The knot seems to be in halfway decent shape. It's soft and pliable, if that means anything. I'm contemplating how to proceed with this thing from here. The collector in me says do nothing beyond maybe rudimentary cleaning. Do I use it? Do I "look at it?" Is there a reference anywhere that will tell what type of knot it came with and other pertinent information concerning this particular model?

    #2 rubberset 55-3 #1.jpg #2 rubberset 55-3 #4.jpg #2 rubberset 55-3 #2.jpg #2 rubberset 55-3 #3.jpg
     
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  2. Rev579

    Rev579 Well-Known Member

    You don't see too many of these, so I too would stop after a good cleaning. I wouldn't necessarily polish it up, but after a washing, slowing detailing the ferrule around the opening. Waiting never hurts, while acting prematurely can result in ruining a good thing.
     
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  3. RyX

    RyX DoH! Staff Member

    Moderator
    Wash it to remove dust, bugs, & previous users funk. Dawn dish liquid cleans well, but might pull any oils out of the bristle because it's a detergent. A hair conditioner could restore softness. I'd avoid very hot water because it could damage the two glues - bristle to plug, & ferrule to handle. As to restoring it - that's your call. A strip and repainting on the lower wood could be done without disturbing the upper. The reddish brown ferrule can be gently sanded to remove many, maybe not all scratches. It's delicate and the lettering is inset and not deep. Changing the knot presents problems - any stress placed on the ferrule may crack it. Should you choose to I'd go with scissors to trim the knot off, then a drill bit to extract the glue plug that holds the bristles.
     
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  4. S Barnhardt

    S Barnhardt Old, Crusty Barn

    Thanks for your suggestion! I'll start out with a weak solution of Dawn, which I have, and warm water. If needed, then go with a conditioner. Would you use conditioner on a brush like this the same way you would on a person's hair?
     
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  5. Rev579

    Rev579 Well-Known Member

    Use the same principle of use for hair on the brush. Also, Tea Tree has some great properties for cleaning as the Dawn treatment.
     
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  6. Primotenore

    Primotenore missed opera tunity

    Article Team
    Very nice acquisition. The knot looks rough. I like Rick's suggestion of trimming the knot with scissors and then carefully reaming out the opening---protecting the ferule with some painter's tape. A dremel works well. Our own Jim, @Jayaruh could do this for you. He has helped me and plenty of us in the past and could transplant the knot of your choosing without issue. As for the finish of the handle, that's your call. Personally, I would treat it gently and keep it as original as possible. Maybe Lemon Oil on the bleached wood and darn near nothing on the ferrule, which might eradicate the lettering.
     
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  7. RyX

    RyX DoH! Staff Member

    Moderator
    I agree with the Rev. Regular human hair conditioner will restore oils and soften dried natural fibers. Tea tree essential oils can kill fungus and bacteria, too. You may need to do several lathers to wash those products out enough for the knot to function properly. Good luck!

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