Wade and Butcher tang stamps

Discussion in 'Straight Razors' started by dangermouse, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. dangermouse

    dangermouse Well-Known Member

    I've noticed a couple of different tang markings for W&B razors. One says 'manufactured by Wade and Butcher Sheffield' but doesn't show their trademark arrow insignia. I wondered if these were genuine. I've noticed a slight variations in the length and style of the arrow but assume this is due to differences in the age of the razor. I've also read that they produced a razor with a bow insignia on the tang but no mention of their name or Sheffield.

    I'm after a cheap Wade and Butcher near wedge - I know. You can stop laughing now :)

    image.jpeg

    image.jpeg
     
  2. Jayaruh

    Jayaruh The Cackalacky House Pet

    Supporting Vendor
    I've stopped laughing now. Mine has the arrow. Good luck on finding your near wedge.
    W&B_09.JPG
     
  3. Enrico

    Enrico Popcorn

    Ok a silly question ... the term near wedge mean mint condition or what?
     
  4. Jayaruh

    Jayaruh The Cackalacky House Pet

    Supporting Vendor
    The term describes the grind.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. dangermouse

    dangermouse Well-Known Member

    Are they mostly hollow ground?
     
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  6. Enrico

    Enrico Popcorn

    Thank you for the explanation. What is most desirable; not that I'm looking to purchase, just like information.
     
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  7. jimjo1031

    jimjo1031 never bloomed myself

    It's possible marks have changed throughout the years. Manufacturers of different items do that from time to time.
     
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  8. Jayaruh

    Jayaruh The Cackalacky House Pet

    Supporting Vendor
    I am still new to all this straight business. I will let someone more experienced answer that question. But, I would imagine that it varies from person to person and from blade to blade and maybe from manufacturer to manufacturer.
     
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  9. Billyfergie

    Billyfergie The Scottish Ninja

    Wade & Butchers Come in All Sorts of Grinds..Personally as Far as Sheffield Razors Go I Wouldn't thank You for One..At Least the Many I Have Honed Thus Far..In Other Words they are Far from Special Bar the Name..:D

    Billy..:chores016:
     
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  10. dangermouse

    dangermouse Well-Known Member

    That's interesting. I had thought the steel was of very good quality. Is there a better Sheffield steel razor (I know it's subjective)? I'm kind of thinking there must be, by your comment.
     
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  11. Billyfergie

    Billyfergie The Scottish Ninja

    Well..That's an Interesting Enquiry..These things are Often Subjective..That Said..Sheffield Razors Like Kropp Or Myers & Sons from the 1920/30s Era are Less Well Known But the Grinds & Edges are Just Superb..Thats Me Talkin Mind..The Point I am Making is that Wade & Butchers are Nothing Special..In Fact..I have NEVER Kept One & Kept Many Other Sheffield Blades that are Less Well Known in Forums at Least..:happy088:

    Billy..:chores016:
     
  12. DaltonGang

    DaltonGang Ol' Itchy Whiskers

    There are many very good Sheffield, and Solingen blades. Me, I tend to like Wade & Butcher, as well as G. Wostenholms. Are there better built out there, yes, but it's all subjective. You pay more for these names, but they are very consistently made. I own many off brands, but unless you know someone who owns these off brands, it can be a crap shoot. Usually Sheffield and Solingen blades are are good start on quality.
     
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  13. alpla444

    alpla444 That's sweet!


    Ive just sent you a PM matey
     
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  14. Spyder

    Spyder Well-Known Member

    I've actually dumped all my Sheffield shavers except my W&B and one very old unnamed Sheffield.
    I much prefer the German, Swedish & Japanese. But that's just me....
     
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  15. dangermouse

    dangermouse Well-Known Member

    Gasp! Wash your dirty mouth out ;)
     
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  16. dangermouse

    dangermouse Well-Known Member

    Thanks mate. That's really interesting.
     
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  17. HolyRollah

    HolyRollah BaconLord Staff Member

    Moderator
    As Billy mentioned, W&B made razors in many sizes and grinds, many for the US market. Earlier razors were typically heavier grinds (near-wedge>wedge grind), but these began to give way to more hollow grinds as demand for them rose. Regarding tang stamps, it was rare that any razor left a Sheffield factory without a maker's stamp somewhere on the steel. Unless there was some prearranged contract with an importer (some makers made blanks for the US market simply stamped "Made in England," post-1891), most manufacturers would stamp one side of the tang (common), tail (rare) or etch the blade face with the company's logo. The "Bow" razor is commonly stamped with the maker's mark on the reverse tang side of the 'bow' icon, or the W&B name was on the blade face.

    As far as consistency (or lack thereof) on the numerous variations of the logo, you have to look at razors within certain eras of manufacture. Often we find a W&B with a simple name stamp and another with name, cross & arrow and think, "Boy, every one of these is different! You'd think the QC manager was absent that day!" Truth be told, we're often looking at razors that may have been made 50, 60 or 75+ years apart, and in large numbers exported all across the US. Considering how long W&B had been cranking out razors (est.1820-1959), and today we tend to gather them all together a hundred years or more later to compare, there's no surprise at the variations we see in the stamping. BUT when we look at models from a determinable time period (say, 1850-1875), the stamping is very consistent and even helps us today to 'place' these into a reasonable time period of production. I'm sure many factors played into the variations we see today in those old razors— possible economic changes, cost-cutting measures, style changes, etc.

    Re: why the current popularity of W&Bs? They are a quality-made product of good Sheffield steel. Not any 'better' than other established Sheffield makers, but still a very decent razor. I believe the relatively-rare and larger-sized W&Bs (8/8, 9/8" and FBUs) are the models that brought particular notoriety to the make and help foster a desire for the W&Bs. I prefer their wedge-grinds to the hollows they made. I've had some truly superb W&B shavers and many that were just ho-hum. I currently have ONE in shave-ready condition and 7-8 W&Bs awaiting new life.

    Another reason I like their wedges over the hollow grind blades....they're less likely to crack!
    This lovely Wade & Butcher 8/8" For Barber's Use (FBU); quarter-hollow, developed a 1/4" crack in the edge during cleaning. I still may eventually hone and use it—being wary of the crack...
    :shocked003::sad023::sad024:
    FBU_88.jpg
     
  18. dangermouse

    dangermouse Well-Known Member

    Thank you for taking the time to write a terrific reply to my question. I meant to say this earlier, but it's been a heck of a few days and I've just got around to it. Your post was really informative and interesting.

    Thank you very much :)
     
  19. HolyRollah

    HolyRollah BaconLord Staff Member

    Moderator
    You're welcome!
    I just read my post above to your queries on my iPhone—and until I actually scrolled through it, I didnt realize the length of my long-winded response....:o blah, blah, blah.....
     
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