After about two months I learned something

Discussion in 'Straight Razors' started by Suhrim21, Jul 16, 2019.

  1. Suhrim21

    Suhrim21 Well-Known Member

    So I got a razor to shave arm hair on 1k. Then went to 6k. Shaves a bit smoother arm hair. By that time back was killing me so tomorrow I will go to jnat. Should I start with slurry. If so how do I know when it's time to go to clear water?
     
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  2. DaltonGang

    DaltonGang Ol' Itchy Whiskers

    I'm somewhat new to slurries. But, I have been very successful with them, my last 10-15 razors. I start with a decent slurry, but not paste like. I then just add water as I go until its incompletely gone, and am using nothing but clear water.
     
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  3. Suhrim21

    Suhrim21 Well-Known Member


    Ok thanks. I will try that. I do have to say I tried again and I think I need to spend some more time on the 6k. It wasn't cutting as good as the 1k. I think the hair I saw was the cut hairs from the 1k. Thinking the edge is probably rolled a bit to one side. I'll spend a little time on the 6k tonight then try the jnat.

    Was also thinking maybe try the Welsh slate. There is a guy on eBay that has a set with 3 in it. An 8-10k. A 12-15k. And a 15+ k slate. So all three of those with slurry stones. They are also 6x2". I'm thinking that might be easier to learn on and develop good edges faster than learning on the jnat. I just have to figure something out. I cannot afford to send razors off to be honed so I can shave with them instead of watching them collecting dust. What are your guys' thoughts on Welsh slate stones?
     
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  4. DaltonGang

    DaltonGang Ol' Itchy Whiskers

    I use Welsh Slates. They will work well, but are very slow. Find some good slurry stones, not the ones provided, and this will speed them up. I have been usig Japanese Naguras. There are several threads talking about Welsh Slates. Here is one I started, a few years ago.

    https://theshaveden.com/forums/threads/welsh-slate-stones.52662/

    ..
     
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  5. Rkep01

    Rkep01 Well-Known Member

    I've found that if you lightly run your fingernail from the spine to over the edge you should be able to feel a burr on one side or the other if the edge is rolled. Then, just give one or two light strokes on that side of the edge and test again until the burr is gone.
     
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  6. Suhrim21

    Suhrim21 Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the thread. I will check it out.

    I didn't feel the burr when I checked after the 6k. But it's not to say it's not there. Need to find my loupe and check it under that.
     
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  7. gssixgun

    gssixgun At this point in time...

    Supporting Vendor
    There is are two tests that you might try

    TNT = (wet) Thumb Nail Test which should let you feel a burr or a harsh edge and actually help to eliminate it

    The Toilet Paper test where you cut a folded piece of Toilet paper LIGHTLY with the edge and see if it grabs


    Hone On !!!


    "Killing the edge"
    Many of us that restore use this to eliminate that harsh edge because we work the steel much harder than just honing
    We set the bevel then drag the edge LIGHTLY across the corner of the hone 1-3 times to kill and even up the bevel then bring it back using very light finishing strokes on the 1k
    Be careful using this technique, many get carried away with it

    The TNT is actually a lighter version of this
     
  8. Steveclarkus

    Steveclarkus Well-Known Member

    I found lapping film to be the least expensive and easiest way to hone.
     
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  9. Trigger

    Trigger Well-Known Member

    A few weeks ago, I honed 3 of my razors using lapping films. It was my first attempt at honing and I could definitely tell the difference in sharpness. It was so much easier to get a great shave. I would venture to say that it is almost idiot proof to hone your razors using this method. Now, I am far from a honemeister, but as long as the bevel is fine, anyone can easily hone their razors using films.
     
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  10. Chuck Naill

    Chuck Naill Well-Known Member

    I'm using a razor this AM that I used a combination of films, coticule, and Thuringian. There lots of nice options today for getting a razor to shave ready.
     
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  11. Steveclarkus

    Steveclarkus Well-Known Member

    I have used film for the last year and a half with excellent results. I just got two Shapton synthetic stones and now have a complete progression of good stones to 12k. In my opinion, films are the best way to learn. Accurate and hassle free. I use diamond pasted strops after I get to 12k for a beautiful 200k finish so what came before the balsa doesn’t really matter as long as it got me to 12k. It’s all in the finish.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2019 at 4:46 PM
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  12. Trigger

    Trigger Well-Known Member

    Great post, Steveclarkus! I appreciate some of these honemeisters youtube videos on honing with different stones. However, some of them try to put the scare into us that honing is difficult. I get that concept if you have to set a bevel on a razor, but to maintain them so that they are shave ready is not rocket science as long as you start at 8K and work you way up through the progression on stones or the corresponding grits on lap films.
     
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  13. Steveclarkus

    Steveclarkus Well-Known Member

    Honing including is much easier than what is most often said. It is all practice and muscle memory. You get better without realizing it. An advantage of using film is that you always are working off a perfectly flat surface (no lapping) and you can concentrate on honing. You don’t need magic stones planted by ancient aliens in the Japanese Alps to get a great edge. Diamond pasted balsa produces just as good an edge but perhaps not as interesting to use. Get a couple of Gold Dollar 66 and just hone. When you get those right you will be a competent honer and expert bevel setter. They aren’t bad shavers either. Also, hold your hone in your hand so the hone and razor will find each other more easily.
     
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  14. Trigger

    Trigger Well-Known Member

    I have enough lapping film to last me for years. I had bought 25 sheets of each (3 um, 1 mu and .3 mu) for $25. Cut these in thirds, you have 225 pieces. That's approx 10 cents a small piece. Each piece is good for 12 razors. So, spending 30 cents to hone 12 razors vs $25 to have a professional to hone 1 razor. I made a wise decision on honing my razors with films.
     
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  15. Chuck Naill

    Chuck Naill Well-Known Member

    Steve did some hand holding in July 2018 when I began. He advised a films set up. I honed my first razor perfectly. Since this I found a Thuringian and really enjoyed holding the stone under a small stream of water, same later with a Coticule. Now I incorporate them all together and use the .5 and .3 after the Thuringian. I'm very pleased.
     
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  16. Suhrim21

    Suhrim21 Well-Known Member

    I'm trying to stay away from films. I learned I wasn't getting the bevel set right. I got one to shave a couple spots on the edge off the 1k. I did learn the king stone cuts very slow on the 1k. The 6k does a good job polishing the edge fairly quickly. My mother just bought a Shapton 12k ceramic stone that was on the bay for 28 bucks. Looks brand new the description said was only used 3-4 times for razors.

    Are the Shapton ceramics splash and go stones or soak stones.
     
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  17. Chuck Naill

    Chuck Naill Well-Known Member

    Just for clarification, a film progression is 30, 12, 9, 3, 1, .5 and .3 micron. While some disagree with this chart, it's still useful for understanding how the razor is begun on 600 grit and finished on 100K.
    sandingGritMicronConversionChart.png

    Not to speak for Steve, but my interest is shaving and not honing. While I enjoy honing, the point for me is to have a sharp knife or razor as a tool to get a job done.
     
  18. Trigger

    Trigger Well-Known Member

    The place I ordered my films only had 1 going to .3; I didn't have a problem going from 1 to .3 microns.
     
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  19. Chuck Naill

    Chuck Naill Well-Known Member

    I used the same source as @Steveclarkus on eBay. The packet ran about $25.
     
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  20. Keithmax

    Keithmax Breeds Pet Rocks

    I think they are splash and go.
     
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