Coticule Honing

Discussion in 'Straight Razors' started by Vlasta, Mar 16, 2017.

  1. Vlasta

    Vlasta Well-Known Member

    Supporting Vendor
    Hi

    I went ahead and bought a coticule on eBay. I am pretty sure it is a Belgian Coticule. I don't have a slurry stone and not sure how to really make it flat - can anyone give any advice?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. DaltonGang

    DaltonGang Ol' Itchy Whiskers

    Make sure it's flat, and has a clean surface before you start. I would use 320 wet/dry sandpaper, and a flat surface.
    Any side pics, and pics of the other side?
    Belgium coticules have duel surfaces, of different types of stone.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2017
    Karl G, Kizurra and Billyfergie like this.
  3. Vlasta

    Vlasta Well-Known Member

    Supporting Vendor
    I will get the other pics and post them. I have yet to receive it from eBay though so these pics are from the auction.
     
    Karl G, Kizurra and DaltonGang like this.
  4. Jayaruh

    Jayaruh The Cackalacky House Pet

    Supporting Vendor
    Happy honing.
     
    Karl G and Kizurra like this.
  5. Vlasta

    Vlasta Well-Known Member

    Supporting Vendor
  6. DaltonGang

    DaltonGang Ol' Itchy Whiskers

    It looks like a cuticle, from the side view, unless my eyes deceive me. Mounting it to a base negates the usability of one side. Let's hope the cracks don't interfere with the honing. I'm not really up on Belgian Coticles, but @gssixgun , or @HolyRollah might chime in.
     
    Karl G, Kizurra and Billyfergie like this.
  7. Mr. Oldschool

    Mr. Oldschool Johnny Dangerously

    My main stone is a coticule. It does a decent job, but I'm not an expert at honing, so I couldn't compare it to other stones. Mine doesn't have any cracks, so I have no idea if that will present an insurmountable problem with this one, or if it can be worked with.
     
  8. HolyRollah

    HolyRollah BaconLord Staff Member

    Moderator
    I'm not expert on Belgian coticules but I do know there is a broad variance in the performance between the stones. Not all coticules are finishers. In fact if you were to peruse the Belgian coticule site, you can specify your sharpening needs and they'll specify the right stone for you. Point being, the right coticule can put an uber-smooth edge on your razor (with practice).
    Re: the cracks- if you can feel them with your fingernail, then they are likely to interfere with your edge.
     
    RichMack, Karl G, Kizurra and 3 others like this.
  9. gssixgun

    gssixgun At this point in time...

    Supporting Vendor
    I use a 325 DMT to Smooth and Lap my Coti

    Anything around that will do fine, including 320 Wet-R-Dry sandpaper

    Easiest test for a Coti to see where you are starting at

    ***Use your thumbnail to try and scratch the surface of the stone***

    Does it leave a mark ??? if not you most likely have a good polishing stone if is does you most likely have a good all around stone
    ****this is NOT a conclusive test it is a fast and dirty check****

    Keep in mind that there are tons of tricks to get the most out of each stone, once lapped the cracks should be of no consequence IF they cannot shift..

    let me know if you have more questions
     
    Karl G, Kizurra, Troy M and 2 others like this.
  10. Vlasta

    Vlasta Well-Known Member

    Supporting Vendor
    Hi - I have the stone. The "cracks" are veins in the stone. I cannot feel any roughness with my nail. The stone needs a little work to make it totally flat but it seems a nice stone to me.Pretty sure it is a coti. I am not going to risk smashing it by taking it out of the wooded holder though.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
    Karl G, Spyder, Kizurra and 1 other person like this.
  11. Vlasta

    Vlasta Well-Known Member

    Supporting Vendor
    Any advice on how to make a slurry?
     
    Karl G, Spyder, Kizurra and 1 other person like this.
  12. gssixgun

    gssixgun At this point in time...

    Supporting Vendor
    Yes either a

    Coti Slurry Stone
    A DMT 325 or 600 Card, very inexpensive
    A small piece of Arkansas stone
     
    Karl G, Spyder, Kizurra and 1 other person like this.
  13. Vlasta

    Vlasta Well-Known Member

    Supporting Vendor
    Does anyone offer a lapping service? I want to get this stone lapped properly. I am still in two minds whether to start trying to hone my own or sending my razors away for honing. I might get this cuty lapped and then sell it on. It is a big one!!
     
    Karl G, mrchick, Spyder and 2 others like this.
  14. DaltonGang

    DaltonGang Ol' Itchy Whiskers

    Lap it yourself, it's not rocket science. Just look up some lapping videos. I've lapped all my stones myself.
     
    Karl G, mrchick, Spyder and 3 others like this.
  15. HolyRollah

    HolyRollah BaconLord Staff Member

    Moderator
    I agree. Have a go at lapping!
    Honing is an acquired skill that may necessitate paying someone more qualified, but lapping can be done by anyone, experienced honers or not.
    The key is ensuring you're acquiring a level surface (pencil grid marks can help here).
     
    Karl G, DaltonGang, mrchick and 3 others like this.
  16. Spyder

    Spyder Well-Known Member

    :signs011: Even I can lap a stone :D
     
    twhite, Karl G, DaltonGang and 3 others like this.
  17. Kizurra

    Kizurra Well-Known Member

    The lines are natural during its formation and are manganese. Fingernail test is good as glen mentioned for quick check of hardness as well as whether she releases any slurry during use and how fast it releases it. A granite tile is short money, 5.00 or less with some wet dry sandpaper from 320 to 1000 should be all you need to flatten. Slurry Imo is more for mid work and just water or running water, depending on the stone for the actual finishing. Coticule.be is a great site to read up on and you should find all the info you could wish for and has a link to some pdf downloads that are fantastic reads as well. Between those two you will be as informed as anyone and then it's just gaining first hand experience. I wouldn't get too caught up in the veins, just how each Rock performs. If it were mine I would saw away the wood close to the stone then knife away even closer til I could sand right to the stone but you have plenty of time to get to know her first before you decide on that. Enjoy the process and experiment as you learn it is a fun process and quite a sense of accomplishment when you really get to know you rock like the palm of your hand.
     
    twhite, Karl G, DaltonGang and 3 others like this.
  18. Vlasta

    Vlasta Well-Known Member

    Supporting Vendor
    Finally ordered a slurry stone..... now lets see if I can hone.
     
    Karl G, Kizurra and DaltonGang like this.
  19. DaltonGang

    DaltonGang Ol' Itchy Whiskers

    You don't have to have a slurry stone. See what it will do without one.
     
    Karl G and Kizurra like this.
  20. Vlasta

    Vlasta Well-Known Member

    Supporting Vendor
    Well Dudes - the big day came. Got me a coticule and got me a slurry stone - got me me two dull razors. Razor 1 is a brand called "Waterville" bought off eBay. Looks nice, square point 4/8". Razor 2 is a Boker Eidelweiss 5/8" also from eBay and it was so dull it would not cut hair at all. So I start off raising a slurry and get it quite thick. Right off I am going to try "elipticote" as per the coticule.be site. I wanted to be a purist so no tape. Well I go trough the elipticote cycle on the Waterville - slowly watered down the slurry until I was basically on water. I know the stone took off steel as I could see the slurry turning grey - so this takes me about 1 hour. as I am slow...... Try to shave some leg hairs (I have quite light fairy hair on my arms so legs are a better target) - nada - could not shave for toffee. I was so disappointed, broke out my USB and looked at the edge - I think the steel on the razor has a problem as it looked all pitted and horrible. Maybe I need to set a new bevel? I lost the photo unfortunately although I will try and get another later today when I get my USB scope out again. So I oiled and put the Waterville away for another day - I will not be beaten!!. Not one to give up I break out the Boker and start the process again - slightly lighter slurry to start with - it actually feels better. The slurry during dilution is taking steel and looks a little gelatinous and some bubbles. Anyway I thin and thin the slurry taking my time to make sure I have the same number of strokes on each side of the blade. Keep my pressure ultralight especially when I get down to basically water. I get to the end - it shaves hair!!!! take a look at before and after pics of the edge. Not the best edge in the world but hey it is my first try honing! I stropped the razor - 25 linen, 50 leather then shaved with it - a 3-pass DFS - TOBS Avocado cream so nice and smooth.


    Before Honing - cruddy edge - would not cut butter - REAL DULL

    [​IMG]

    After Honing - shaved nicely. I am proud of myself!

    [​IMG]

    If anyone is interested I cleaned up the coticule and there are some pics below - the thing was basically stuck in it's holder by dried slurry and the crud of decades. Now it is nice and clean, flat and it works!! The whole process was kind of zen like. I had Google home playing Elvis in the background, a tray on my lap with the stone, the razor and a pot of water and I was in the zone!

    Q. If I flattened the blue side could this be a bevel setter or not worth the effort?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    upload image from mobile
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2017

Share This Page