Fall/winter eats

Discussion in 'The Cookbook' started by gorgo2, Oct 10, 2015.

  1. preidy

    preidy Just call me Dino

    That would stick to your ribs.
     
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  2. RaZorBurn123

    RaZorBurn123 waiting hardily...............

    What part? Or all?
     
  3. PLANofMAN

    PLANofMAN Paperboy

    Article Team
    Sure. When I get back to a computer. It's a bit much to type out on a phone.
     
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  4. PLANofMAN

    PLANofMAN Paperboy

    Article Team
    [​IMG]
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    The Southwest seasoning we didn't have on hand so we followed Emeril's recipe:
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sou...y2c3Gly73OuzRm4fg&sig2=ndzsG0An-HARt7eEAaj-uw
    I cooked the pork on a cast iron grill for five minutes per side, as the recipe called for, but the meat thermometer indicated it was about 93° in the center, so I set the oven to 350° and placed the grill inside the oven and finished them there. Pulled them out when the thermometer read 157° and let the meat rest for a few minutes.

    The potatoes are cooked in chicken stock (or broth) with two crushed garlic cloves until the broth boils away, then gently 'smashed' and browned on both sides. It takes about 30 minutes.

    The broccoli is steamed for about 5 minutes.
     
  5. richgem

    richgem suffering from chronic clicker hand cramps

    Woot! Thank you, Ryan!
     
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  6. PLANofMAN

    PLANofMAN Paperboy

    Article Team
    We still have lots of barbeque sauce left, and pork ribs in the fridge, so I'm seeing brined-chipotle barbeque ribs in my weekend...
    :)

    Let me know how yours turns out.
     
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  7. richgem

    richgem suffering from chronic clicker hand cramps

    Hmm... did I hear you say come over for dinner tonight? I coulda sworn.... :D

    I'm off on some vacation next 1.5 wks, so it's going to be a while (plus I have to find someplace that carries chipotle). But, I'll definitely let you know.
     
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  8. PLANofMAN

    PLANofMAN Paperboy

    Article Team
    I used canned Chipotle peppers.

    ...and the ribs turned out pretty awesome. Not as good as the loin chops, but pretty hard to beat anyways.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016
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  9. richgem

    richgem suffering from chronic clicker hand cramps

    One of the downsides to living just outside the boonies is that the supermarket doesn't carry too many "exotic" ingredients. (as in, "what's a skirt steak?"/cry). Maybe I'll have some luck in the "ethnic" section.
     
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  10. PLANofMAN

    PLANofMAN Paperboy

    Article Team
    I think that's the first time I've ever heard a 'skirt steak' referred to as an 'exotic ingredient.' Lol

    Edit: BTW, here's a picture of those ribs:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016
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  11. Bama Samurai

    Bama Samurai with Laser-like Focus Staff Member

    Moderator
    A skirt steak is the diaphragm in the thorax that inflates the lungs of the cow. It sees a lot of work, is highly flavorful, and this cut is called "la fajita" by Spanish speakers in the SW US and North of Mexico. It's normally pounded flat to tenderize, marinated with cilantro, lime, tequila and chiles. Seared over extremely hot coals and sliced across the grain is the normal way. The word was appropriated as "fajitas" into Tejano English, and then English as a whole for a tortilla containing fresh grilled meat with grilled meats and grilled onions, grilled Padilla or bell peppers, generally served family style hot off the charcoal. Flank steak is most similar in taste, but has a very different grain structure.

    The phrase "chicken fajitas" is funny to me.
     
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  12. PLANofMAN

    PLANofMAN Paperboy

    Article Team
    I think I could have cheerfully gone the rest of my life without knowing that skirt steak is actually a cow's (or steer's) diaphragm. I use it for both fajitas and on occasion, morning omelets.
     
  13. S Barnhardt

    S Barnhardt Old, Crusty Barn

    Was wandering through "The Cookbook" portion of TSD and found your post re: Hungarian cottage cheese and noodles. Asked my wife if she'd ever had that. Her Maternal Grandma Bartolf, "MeMaw", came to this country from Semlak. She said she had forgotten about that. Called it "cheese" and noodles. Used a name that sounded like "case" noodles with the case spelling how I heard it. She cooks a couple, or so, of her MeMaw's recipes. Good stuff, that Hungarian food.
     
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