Restoration Questions

Discussion in 'The Brush' started by rmcintyre84, Jan 8, 2020.

  1. rmcintyre84

    rmcintyre84 Got out of the kitchen

    1. What polishes do you use for brush handles of all types? What about clear lucite handles?
    2. Can you recommend decent tutorials on re-knotting for non-tool guys? I have a Dremel, and that's it. No bench vise, no drill press, etc.
    Thanks.
     
    PLANofMAN and jimjo1031 like this.
  2. jimjo1031

    jimjo1031 never bloomed myself

    When I first started, I used a rotary tool with a drill bit. After cutting off the knot as close as possible to the handle, I started at the middle until I got deep enough and worked my way to the edge in a circular motion. Then I used 1/2" sanding drum bit to finish the side smooth. You can also use the sanding bit to enlarge the opening for a larger knot. Eventually I got some burring bits to help speed up getting the knot out. There are many polishes you can use like Flitz, Novus, Mother's Meguairs, and the one I'm using now is Blue Magic. Novus is made for use on plastic and has I think three different types, or grits.
     
    Enrico likes this.
  3. PLANofMAN

    PLANofMAN Paperboy

    Article Team
    From the everything you need to know about brushes thread:

    Edit: the video thread is still up, but i think the pictures are gone from most of the restoration threads i linked below.

    "Restoration. At some point in one's shaving career, you are bound to come across vintage shave brushes. Some can be used as they are, but most will need to be restored. Manufacturers like Rooney and Vulfix/Simpson will be happy to restore your old Roony or Simpson brush...for a price. Brush restoration does not need to cost an arm and a leg though. Brush restoration can be done with simple tools and can be a fun DIY project. Gary (GDCarrington) helpfully provided the following information:

    "Here are some restoration threads.
    Where there is a will, there is a way - Synthetic Redux (Picture Heavy)
    Win Some, Lose Some - Restoration Story
    Let's Go With The Winner - A Restoration Story Continued
    Rubberset Redux (Green/Butterscotch with Black Swirl)
    Some methods use drills, Dremel tool and sandpaper, others steam. Be sure not to steam older plastics, but use the manual drilling technique." Steaming can also cause the stamping depression on some brushes to flatten out, making retouching the letters and numbers difficult.

    Video! Another Reknot for Shawna by Stingraysrock

    Gary has graciously showed us the gamut of brush restorations, ranging from epic failures to successes. For those wanting to start doing brush restoration, www.thegoldennib.com is the primary source for affordable quality knots.
    Envy Shave is a new supplier of high quality knots as well. It is who Wolf Whiskers uses for his custom brushes.
    Larry at Whipped Dog also supplies knots as well and has become a favorite supplier for many here at TSD. Whipped Dog."
     
    PanChango likes this.
  4. rmcintyre84

    rmcintyre84 Got out of the kitchen

    Are there people on here who, if I send them the brush and knot, would do the work for me?
     
  5. PLANofMAN

    PLANofMAN Paperboy

    Article Team
    Yes, there probably are. I'm not one of them. You would have to accept that there is the possibility that the handle might break during the knot removal process, and most people are reluctant to work on other people's vintage handles for this reason. I've broken at least one good brush handle myself.

    The fact that you referenced a lucite handle implies that the top part of the handle is most likely painted on the inside. Whoever removes the knot will need to clean up and repaint the socket before installing a new knot.

    Pictures would be helpful.
     
    Terry likes this.
  6. rmcintyre84

    rmcintyre84 Got out of the kitchen

    Right now I'm just curious.
     
    Terry likes this.
  7. PanChango

    PanChango Not Cute

    Quite honestly, the rotary tool and some patience are all you need. It isn't that hard.
     
    Ijustmissedthe50s and Terry like this.
  8. pdieten

    pdieten New Member

    Well, that and an assortment of grinding stones otherwise the Dremel isn't too useful. Typically if I'm digging the knot out of a solid resin handle I use a few different sanding and grinding tools but the 85602 silicon carbide stone is one I get a lot of use from. Makes a nice flat shelf to mount the new knot.

    Just be prepared for a godawful stink.
     
    PLANofMAN likes this.
  9. jimjo1031

    jimjo1031 never bloomed myself

    One idea I have to redo the black for acrylic handles is to apply a thin coating of JB Weld along the bottom and side. When dry, install the knot. This way it's already black and paint won't be needed. Epoxy doesn't always stick to paint and if you want to use silicone for installing the knot, you're better off. Unless you use an oil based paint when using silicone.
     
    Terry likes this.
  10. Terry

    Terry Tool Admirer

    I've only done about 8 handels.
    First cut the knot down as close to the handle as possible.
    I found if it's hollow, use a 1/4 inch drill bit to drill a hole in the knot, then use a large varibit to take out the rest.
    If the handel isn't hollow, i use a forstner bit that's about the size of the hole.
    I have filled hollow handles with quarters for weight, left the hollow handels empty, and re-knoted sold handles. I've used clear and color epoxy, both seem to work fine.
    I normally put the epoxy in the handel then press the knot in the solid handle. I put epoxy on both when it's hollow. I just look it over and check fit and depth before I epoxy anything.
    tp
     
  11. Terry

    Terry Tool Admirer

  12. rmcintyre84

    rmcintyre84 Got out of the kitchen

    Thanks everyone!
     
  13. rmcintyre84

    rmcintyre84 Got out of the kitchen

    If I were to use a drill rather than a Dremel, i assume safety dictates I use a vise? (I'm clearly not a tool guy.)
     
  14. pdieten

    pdieten New Member

    I never did but that's up to you. The material you're drilling into isn't very hard and is cut easily by the bit.
     
  15. Lipripper60

    Lipripper60 Member

    D remel is,plenty good. Trim knot like stated. Use a bit or burr in the middle and start wallowing out the hole. When you get close to,the edges the knot can be cracked out. Make sure the Dremel tool is spinning away from the work on the leading edge,instead,of,spinning towards the work. They tend to "dig in" if not spinning away, making control tenuous at best. Go slowly. If the handle is hollow, pour it full of a mix of sand and epoxy and for peters sake use mostly sand. It's cheap and weights a handle very well. Build up the sand/epoxy to 15mm from the top (or however deep you want your knot to sit.). After that cures, polish the handle. I start with 400 grit wet/dry paper and progress to 2000grit and follow with a plastic polish. After polish I'll set the knot. Start by sanding the knot plug (the wafer of glue holding the knot together) to roughen it up so glue will hold. More than likely your polishing operation also took the edge off the knot socket but if that handle rim is sharp, kill it with some sanding inside the knot socket. Place knot in socket and LOOK. Is it pleasing to the eye? Is it too deep? Add a coin or two under the knot to raise it up. Find where you want the loft then glue stuff into place with epoxy or silicon. Silicon has the benefit of removing the knot to make adjustments by grabbing the knot and twisting/pulling to remove it. Epoxy is a bit more permanent. The biggest pitfall in a restoration is too much glue. A little goes a long way and you don't want glue oozing out of the socket and into the bristles.
     

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